This … Not That

Incubating hen versus automated incubation

Incubating hen versus automated incubation

I believe that every chick deserves a mother. And that every chick deserves a rich life exploring gardens, pasture and woodland.
My chickens grow slowly, taking four to nine months to mature, instead of the six to nine weeks most broiler chickens live.

Baby chicks

Baby chicks

Their mothers raise them for one to two months, teaching them what chicken life is all about. After their mothers start taking them outdoors (two to seven days after hatching), my chickens spend every day outdoors, rain or shine, scratching for delicious earthworms, bugs, eating fresh greens, taking dirt baths in the sun, and enjoying life to the fullest. At night they get to sleep, safe and sound, under their mother’s warm feathers, listening to her soft heartbeat all night long.

Growing chicks

Growing chicks

And as they mature, these chicks live life to the fullest. They get to explore grassy meadows, roam through woodland, and eat their fill of thimble berries and blackberries in the summer. They have a wonderful story to tell.

Roaster

Young rooster ready for roasting

A few lucky customers have had the good fortune of tasting the extra creamy, buttery eggs my hens lay.
Now, you have the rare chance of enjoying freshly butchered chicken from these mother-raised chickens. Chickens are not butchered until ordered. They are never frozen. Their meat is dense and flavorful, their fat a brillant yellow, their bones as hard as ivory. You’ve never eaten chicken like this before.

The price is $15.00 a pound. They are butchered no more than 24 hours before you get them.

For more information email: theman@amanandhishoe.com or bowfarm@me.com
call or text 360-202-0386.

2 Responses to This … Not That

  1. napkinwriter says:

    As young children, on our summers on my grandfather’s Wisconsin farm, we plucked the freshly butchers chickens for my grandmother’s Sunday chicken dinner. Now, in my 70s, I know why I have insisted, that for a very long time, I have not tasted chicken like that.

  2. auntynini says:

    I have 5 chickens – 3 hens and 2 roosters (they were supposed to be hens too when I got all of them as 16 week old pullets.) We are in our 4th year together, all of us, along with a pack o’ dogs: the hens are still laying – albeit with less frequency, and the roosters have finally settled down a bit and are just enjoying life.

    This cozy little flock I consider as pets, so no eating them or giving them up. They are also way more expensive to keep than they could ever produce in eggs or meat: from large heated coop spaces and background music in the dead of winter to daily romaine lettuce, watermelons, grapes, and mealworm (ALL of which they adore and insist upon) in addition to their organic layer grains, and free range fare of grasses, weeds, bugs, and worms, they do live the high life.

    Chickens are the most amazing, intelligent, funny, loving and joyful pets. Smarter even than dogs, if you can believe it!

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